GSA 2015

2015 GSA Pre-Conference Workshop

Date & Location:
Subjective Well-being Assessment in Minority Aging Research

Wednesday, November 18
8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Walt Disney World Swan & Dolphin
Orlando, Florida

Overview

Improving the well-being of the population is an increasingly important policy goal in addition to its possible role in reducing mortality, morbidity, and disability. Conceptualizing and measuring well-being is an evolving science and there is evidence that both the concept and its measurement may vary across diverse groups. To be able to contribute to research and the public policy that relies on that research, it is essential that researchers have the appropriate tools for measuring well-being and are aware of the limitations of these measures. The purpose of this year's Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) Pre-Conference Workshop is to provide a forum for researchers at all levels to discuss the importance and challenges of measuring well-being among older adults in different racial and ethnic populations, and to identify strategies for maximizing the validity, reliability, and utility of those measures.

Accreditation

The National Board of Public Health Examiners has certified this activity for up to 4 Continuing Education Credits.

Planning Committee

Ron Hays (UCLA); Arie Kapteyn (USC); Mignon Moore (UCLA); Dan Mungas (UC Davis)
Steve Schwartz (U Wash/U Colorado); Anita Stewart (UCSF); Tom Templin (WSU/U Michigan)
Jeanne Teresi (Columbia University); Steven P. Wallace (UCLA Coordinating Center)
Rob Weech-Maldonado (Deep South)

Presented by Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research

Supported with funding from the National Institute of Aging Grant R13-AG-023033

Co-Sponsored by: The Gerontological Society of America's (GSA) Minority Issues in Gerontology Committee & GSA Behavioral and Social Science section
Overview

Improving the well-being of the population is an increasingly important policy goal in addition to its possible role in reducing mortality, morbidity, and disability. Conceptualizing and measuring well-being is an evolving science and there is evidence that both the concept and its measurement may vary across diverse groups. To be able to contribute to research and the public policy that relies on that research, it is essential that researchers have the appropriate tools for measuring well-being and are aware of the limitations of these measures. The purpose of this year's Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) Pre-Conference Workshop is to provide a forum for researchers at all levels to discuss the importance and challenges of measuring well-being among older adults in different racial and ethnic populations, and to identify strategies for maximizing the validity, reliability, and utility of those measures.

Objectives
At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will:
  1. Describe the three main approaches to defining and measuring subjective well-being
  2. Identify the value of including subjective well-being measures in minority aging research
  3. Outline the complexities of cross-group comparisons of well-being and approaches to addressing those complexities
  4. Discuss how to incorporate well-being into research questions, analysis, and dissemination
Outcomes from the Conference
  1. Introduce minority aging researchers to the usefulness and impact of research on subjective well-being
  2. Stimulate new research using state of the art measures on well-being that is relevant to minority aging research
  3. Improve the utility of research on well-being among elders of color in policy and practice

Schedule

8:00 am Welcoming Remarks and Overview of Conference Objectives

Lisbeth Nielsen, PhD, NIA
                        Steven P. Wallace, PhD*, RCMAR Coordinating Center
Arie Kapteyn, PhD*, Workshop Chair

8:15 amThe State-of-the-Science in Measuring Well-being

Arthur Stone, PhD
Professor of Psychology, Senior Behavioral Scientist, Center for Economic and Social Research
                        Chair, National Academy of Sciences panel on “Measuring subjective well-being in a policy-relevant framework”

9:15 am The Role of Well-being Measures in Minority Aging Research

James S. Jackson, PhD*
(MUCAAAR), Professor of Psychology; Professor of Health Behavior & Health Education
(Public Health); Director, Institute for Social Research
University of Michigan

9:45 am

Measures of Well-Being Across Different DomainsWell-Being and its Determinants


Arie Kapteyn, PhD*.
Professor of Economics & Executive Director, Center for Economic and Social Research

Varieties of Well-Being and Their Links to Health
Carol Ryff, PhD
Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

10:45 am Break
11:00 am

How well-being dimensions vary across the rich and the poor

Carol Graham, PhD
Leo Pasvolsky Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution; and College Park Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

11:30 am

Overlap and Distinctions between Well-being and Health-related Quality of Life
                        Ron D. Hays, PhD*
(CHIME), Professor, University of California-Los Angeles*

12:00 pm

Working Lunch (no host) – How can you incorporate well-being into your own research?

1:00pm

Measuring Well-being in National Datasets and Public Health Surveillance
Jacqui Smith, PhD*
Professor of Psychology & Research Professor Institute for Social Research
Co-Investigator, Health and Retirement Study
University of Michigan*

1:30 pm

Black and White differences in happiness among an older population in Alabama

Robert Weech-Maldonado, PhD, Professor, University of Alabama, Birmingham*   

1:45 pm

Measurement Equivalence across Populations: Making sure Comparisons are Valid, Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches

Anita  Stewart, PhD, Professor, University of California, San Francisco*
Jeanne Teresi, EdD, PhD, Columbia University

2:45 pm Afternoon Break
3:00 pm

Panel Discussion: Bringing Minority Aging into the Well-Being Research Agenda

4:00 pm

Closing Comments | Evaluations | Adjourn

Nina Harawa, MPH, PhD*

  *RCMAR faculty, scholar, or from RCMAR institution